source: gramene.org
Q: Where can you find wild rice growing?
A:  In shallow lakes and low flowing streams…


Wild rice (also called Canada rice, Indian rice, andwater oats) is four species of grasses forming the genusZizania, and the grain which can be harvested from them. The grain was historically gathered and eaten in both North America and China. While it is now something of a delicacy in North America, the grain is no longer eaten in China, where the plant’s stem is used as a vegetable.
Wild rice is not directly related to Asian Rice (Oryza sativa), whose wild progenitors are O. rufipogon and O. nivara, although they are close cousins, sharing the tribeOryzeae. It is also not the plant described as ζιζάνια (zizania) in the Parable of the Tares in the Bible, which is thought to be Lolium temulentum.
The plants grow in shallow water in small Lakes and slow-flowing Streams; often, only the flowering head of wild rice rises above the water. The grain is eaten byDabbling ducks and other aquatic wildlife, as well as humans. (more..)

source: gramene.org

Q: Where can you find wild rice growing?

A:  In shallow lakes and low flowing streams…

Wild rice (also called Canada riceIndian rice, andwater oats) is four species of grasses forming the genusZizania, and the grain which can be harvested from them. The grain was historically gathered and eaten in both North America and China. While it is now something of a delicacy in North America, the grain is no longer eaten in China, where the plant’s stem is used as a vegetable.

Wild rice is not directly related to Asian Rice (Oryza sativa), whose wild progenitors are O. rufipogon and O. nivara, although they are close cousins, sharing the tribeOryzeae. It is also not the plant described as ζιζάνια (zizania) in the Parable of the Tares in the Bible, which is thought to be Lolium temulentum.

The plants grow in shallow water in small Lakes and slow-flowing Streams; often, only the flowering head of wild rice rises above the water. The grain is eaten byDabbling ducks and other aquatic wildlife, as well as humans. (more..)

Preparing http://The PlantEncyclopedia.org for the coming soon Mobile App & more Beta Phase enhancements

Preparing http://The PlantEncyclopedia.org for the coming soon Mobile App & more Beta Phase enhancements

via nybg:

The Dutch build an edible house. Produce included radishes, bok choy, strawberries, lettuce, and various herbs. Brilliant!

via nybg:

The Dutch build an edible house. Produce included radishes, bok choy, strawberries, lettuce, and various herbs. Brilliant!

(Source: gardendesign.com)


Q: What is the Japanese name for “hosta”?
A: Giboshi!
Hosta: is a Genus of about 23–45 Species of Lily-like plants native to northeast Asia

Though Hosta plantaginea originates in China, most of the species that provide the modern shade garden plants were introduced from Japan to Europe by Philipp Franz von Siebold in the mid-19th century. Newer species have been discovered on the Korean peninsula as well.
Hostas are widely cultivated Ground cover plants, particularly useful in the garden as shade-tolerant plants. Hybridization within and among species and cultivars has produced numerous Cultivars, with over 3000 registered and named varieties, and perhaps as many more that are not yet registered with the American Hosta Society
(more…)

Q: What is the Japanese name for “hosta”?

A: Giboshi!

Hosta: is a Genus of about 23–45 Species of Lily-like plants native to northeast Asia

Though Hosta plantaginea originates in China, most of the species that provide the modern shade garden plants were introduced from Japan to Europe by Philipp Franz von Siebold in the mid-19th century. Newer species have been discovered on the Korean peninsula as well.

Hostas are widely cultivated Ground cover plants, particularly useful in the garden as shade-tolerant plants. Hybridization within and among species and cultivars has produced numerous Cultivars, with over 3000 registered and named varieties, and perhaps as many more that are not yet registered with the American Hosta Society

(more…)


Q: When is a plant species considered “aquatic”?
A:  A plant is consider “aquatic” in gardening, botany, and horticulture, if it can grow submerged under water, or with a portion of it’s roots submerged.
Alternanthera pungens, known as khakiweed 
Alternanthera is a genus of approximately 80 herbaceous plant species in Amaranthaceae, the amaranth family. It is a widespread genus with a cosmopolitan distribution…..(more..)

Q: When is a plant species considered “aquatic”?

A:  A plant is consider “aquatic” in gardening, botany, and horticulture, if it can grow submerged under water, or with a portion of it’s roots submerged.

Alternanthera pungens, known as khakiweed 

Alternanthera is a genus of approximately 80 herbaceous plant species in Amaranthaceae, the amaranth family. It is a widespread genus with a cosmopolitan distribution…..(more..)

Trick Question: What kind of plant is this?
Answer: This is not a plant, but an animal.

LETTUCE SEA SLUG (Eysia crispata) ©Warrenphotographic.co.uk
The lettuce sea slug, is a large and colorful species of sea slug, a marine opisthobranch gastropod mollusk. It resembles a nudibranch, but it is not closely related to that order of gastropods. It is instead a sacoglossan.
This species lives in the tropical parts of the western Atlantic, the Caribbean faunal zone. This sea slug (in common with some other sacoglossans) has algal chloroplasts (from its seaweed food sources) functioning within its tissues, providing it with sugars. This unusual phenomenon is known as kleptoplasty.
This species is called the lettuce slug because it is often green in  color, and it always has a very frilly edge to its parapodia. This makes  the slug resemble the curly kinds of lettuce, such as the lollo rosso variety. The maximum length of this species is about 50 mm. The lettuce slug is extremely variable in color.
Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elysia_crispata

Trick Question: What kind of plant is this?

Answer: This is not a plant, but an animal.

LETTUCE SEA SLUG (Eysia crispata) ©Warrenphotographic.co.uk

The lettuce sea slug, is a large and colorful species of sea slug, a marine opisthobranch gastropod mollusk. It resembles a nudibranch, but it is not closely related to that order of gastropods. It is instead a sacoglossan.

This species lives in the tropical parts of the western Atlantic, the Caribbean faunal zone. This sea slug (in common with some other sacoglossans) has algal chloroplasts (from its seaweed food sources) functioning within its tissues, providing it with sugars. This unusual phenomenon is known as kleptoplasty.

This species is called the lettuce slug because it is often green in color, and it always has a very frilly edge to its parapodia. This makes the slug resemble the curly kinds of lettuce, such as the lollo rosso variety. The maximum length of this species is about 50 mm. The lettuce slug is extremely variable in color.

Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elysia_crispata

(Source: animalworld, via catherinewillis)

via annrafalko:

nybg:

Magnolias are blooming all over the Garden. This one, in front of the Library Building, smells especially nice!

Gotta love that the duties of my job include taking BlackBerry pictures of incredible trees and taking time to stop and smell the flowers.

via annrafalko:

nybg:

Magnolias are blooming all over the Garden. This one, in front of the Library Building, smells especially nice!

Gotta love that the duties of my job include taking BlackBerry pictures of incredible trees and taking time to stop and smell the flowers.

Many plants that are extinct in the wild due to habitat loss, are kept in existence by botanical & home gardens around the planet.

The Plant Encyclopedia on iPhone.

The Plant Encyclopedia on iPhone.

Q: A Peanut is not a nut. What sort of plant is a Peanut? ……………………………………………………………………….
A: A Peanut (Arachis hypogaea) is a Bean!

Q: A Peanut is not a nut. What sort of plant is a Peanut? ……………………………………………………………………….

A: A Peanut (Arachis hypogaea) is a Bean!